Ubuntu 14.04 LTS vs. Oracle Linux vs. CentOS vs. openSUSE

Since last week’s release of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS we have been busy benchmarking Ubuntu 14.04 in a variety of configurations. Already some of the Ubuntu “Trusty Tahr” benchmarks we have done recently include 12.04.4 vs. 13.10 vs. 14.04 benchmarks, a 20-way graphics card comparison, server benchmarks, and results in many other articles. We are in the process of doing a larger, server/enterprise-oriented Linux distribution. More distributions are still being tested, but to get a new week of benchmarking started at Phoronix, here are some results of Ubuntu Linux, Oracle Linux, CentOS, and openSUSE.
Phoronix

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How to install Roundcube on your ISPConfig3 server on CentOS 6

How to install Roundcube on your ISPConfig3 server on CentOS 6This tutorial has been created for those who have installed The Perfect Server – CentOS 6.4 x86_64 [ISPConfig 3] and wish to have alternative webmail application – Roundcube. You may still able access to Squiremail as this Roundcube installation will not overwrite the Squirremail.
LXer Linux News

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How to install Roundcube on your ISPConfig3 server on CentOS 6

How to install Roundcube on your ISPConfig3 server on CentOS 6

This tutorial has been created for those who have installed The Perfect Server – CentOS 6.4 x86_64 [ISPConfig 3] and wish to have alternative webmail application – Roundcube. You may still able access to Squiremail as this Roundcube installation will not overwrite the Squirremail.

HowtoForge – Linux Howtos and Tutorials – Linux

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How to set up a secondary DNS server in CentOS

In the previous tutorial, we created a primary DNS server (ns1) for a test domain example.tst. In this tutorial, we will create a secondary DNS server (ns2) for the same domain by using bind package on CentOS. When it comes to setting up a secondary DNS server, the following factors should be kept in mind. […]Continue reading…The post How to set up a secondary DNS server in CentOS appeared first on Xmodulo.Related FAQs:How to set up a primary DNS server using CentOSHow to add a secondary hard disk to Xen DomUHow to set up MailScanner, Clam Antivirus and SpamAssassin in CentOS mail serverHow to assign multiple IP addresses to one network interface on CentOSHow to set up BGP Looking Glass server on CentOS
LXer Linux News

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How to set up a primary DNS server using CentOS

Any operational domain has at least two DNS servers, one being called a primary name server (ns1), and the other a secondary name server (ns2). These servers are typically operated for DNS failover: If one server goes down, the other server becomes an active DNS server. More sophisticated failover mechanisms involving load balancers, firewalls and clusters are also possible.
LXer Linux News

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