Free software hacker on open source telemetry project for OpenStack

Julien Danjou is a free software hacker almost all of the time. At his day job, he hacks on OpenStack for eNovance. And, in his free time, he hacks on free software projects like Debian, Hy, and awesome. Julien has also written The Hacker[he]#039[/he]s Guide to Python and given talks on OpenStack and the Ceilometer project, among other things. Prior to his talk at OpenStack Summit 2014 in Paris this year, we interviewed him about his current work and got some great insight into the work going on for the Ceilometer project, the open source telemetry project for OpenStack.
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Free software hacker on open source telemetry project for OpenStack

Blue clouds, open source cloud

Julien Danjou is a free software hacker almost all of the time. At his day job, he hacks on OpenStack for eNovance. And, in his free time, he hacks on free software projects like Debian, Hy, and awesome. Julien has also written The Hacker’s Guide to Python and given talks on OpenStack and the Ceilometer project, among other things.

Prior to his talk at OpenStack Summit 2014 in Paris this year, we interviewed him about his current work and got some great insight into the work going on for the Ceilometer project, the open source telemetry project for OpenStack.

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Opensource.com

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Free Bassel Khartabil

Apparently, working for a free and open Internet also caught the attention of the Syrian government, which sadly wasn’t as enamored with Bassel’s work as was Foreign Policy magazine. On March 15, 2012, Bassel was detained in a wave of arrests in the Mazzeh district of Damascus, Syria.
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Now Available as a Free Download: Research on Open Innovation

In Brussels, they really get “open.” In Washington, D.C., well, not so much. It would be easy, and even no surprise, to spend a year in Washington, D.C. and never hear the word “open” used during a high level policy discussion. It’s quite the opposite in Europe, where all things open (standards, source code, data and research) have been the subject of lively discussion and incorporation into core policy goals and directives. Nor has that happened by coincidence.
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