Ubuntu 14.04 In The Power8 Cloud From RunAbove

Yesterday I shared my preview of RunAbove’s PowerPC cloud using IBM’s latest POWER8 CPUs. RunAbove’s PowerPC cloud currently offers an instance type up to 176 threads, for which I’ve spent the past few days of benchmarking. While initially the only operating system enabled in the POWER8 cloud was Fedora 19, now Ubuntu 14.04 LTS is also an option…
Phoronix

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How to download an ISO image with BitTorrent fast and safely from the command line

If you are one of those guys who have urge to try out every new (or even beta) release of Linux distribution to satisfy your curiosity and stay up-to-date, you will need to deal with the hassle of downloading big ISO images every now and then. ISO providers typically put up .torrent file of their […]Continue reading…The post How to download an ISO image with BitTorrent fast and safely from the command line appeared first on Xmodulo.Related FAQs:How to PGP encrypt, decrypt or digitally sign files via GnuPG GUI How to set up Clam Antivirus, SpamAssassin and MailScanner on Ubuntu mail server How to create multiple VPN tunnels between two hosts using tinc VPN How to set up a secure SFTP server in Linux How to set up a secure Apache webserver on Ubuntu
LXer Linux News

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Open source moves from accepted to expected

Dwight Merriman is executive chairman and co-founder of MongoDB, an open source document database. Prior to MongoDB, Dwight was co-founder of DoubleClick and Panther Express (CDNetworks). He will give a keynote at the upcoming All Things Open conference in Raleigh this year. In this interview, I asked him a few questions about open source, MongoDB’s business model, the challenges of hiring developers, and more. Dwight discusses open source and how it has moved from being accepted to expected.
LXer Linux News

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Ghost in the (Bourne Again) Shell: Fallout of Shellshock far from over

The problem with Shellshock is similar to problems that emerged after the Heartbleed bug and numerous other vulnerabilities—while organizations struggle to understand the disclosures, how they affect their systems, and how to successfully implement patches, others—including security researchers—race to build proof-of-concept attacks based on them to demonstrate exactly how dire they are. And those proofs of concept often get picked up by cybercriminals and others with bad intent before organizations can effectively patch them—using them to exploit systems in ways that are much longer-lasting than the vulnerability du jour.
LXer Linux News

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