Five common pitfalls to avoid in open source

open source pitfalls

Open source software, hardware, and methods are gaining popularity and access to them couldn’t be more prolific. If you’re thinking about starting a new open source project, there are five common pitfalls you should be aware of before you begin.

Don’t despair if you’ve already started your project and are just now reading this! These pointers can be helpful at any stage if things are still running smoothly.

Fail faster and succeed with open source.

5 common pitfalls of a new open source project

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Five common pitfalls to avoid in open source

Open source software, hardware, and methods are gaining popularity and access to them couldn't be more prolific. If you're thinking about starting a new open source project, there are five common pitfalls you should be aware of before you begin.Don't despair if you've already started your project and are just now reading this! These pointers can be helpful at any stage if things are still running smoothly.Fail faster and succeed with open source.5 common pitfalls of a new open source project
LXer Linux News

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US government accelerating development and release of open source

I had a chance to catch up with David A. Wheeler, a long-time leader in advising and working with the US government on issues related to open source software. As early as the late 1990s, David was demonstrating why open source software was integral to the US goverment IT architecture, and his personal webpage is a frequently cited source on open standards, open source software, and computer security.In this interview, we explore the current state of use of open source software by the US government, the challenges of the Federal acquisition system, and what he's excited about as he looks ahead for open source and government.
LXer Linux News

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Open source tools allow Project Tango to evolve with speed and agility

Google's Project Tango is a platform for Android phones and tablets designed to track the full 3-dimensional motion of the device as you hold it, while simultaneously creating a map of the environment around it. The devices track themselves with an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and collect 3D points with a built-in depth-sensing camera. Project Tango is progressing at a fast pace thanks to many open source tools that facilitate the use of the 3D data. Only 200 of these devices have been made available to early testers and developers, and we had the luck of getting two of them at Kitware.
LXer Linux News

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